Canada and Russia Arctic and Northern Working Group
  There is an increasing realization that as North America’s production of conventional oil and gas enters a more mature stage of their production life cycle; they must look to emerging producing regions to make up the shortfalls cause by the production declines. Oil demand in China is projected to be 6.5 MMBbl/day by 2010, second only to the US Forecast of 25.2 MMBbl/day. This demand may be underestimated because China’s booming economy is growing at a rate of 30% per year. Reserves in 2004 are depleting three times as fast as new reserves are being discovered.
  It is estimated that Russian production could be increased by 15% using technologies imported from the more mature producing countries such as Canada. Consequentially, there will be a high demand for transporting oilfield equipment to these new producing areas in Russia. While much of this equipment could be sent via marine transport because it is destined for the Sakhalin Islands, which can be reached by ships, amphibious hybrid air vehicle might have a role to play in the transport of high value equipment that could be damaged or stolen in transit. The potential impacts and opportunities have been explored in detail in a report prepared by LPS Aviation.
  As well, industry groups are starting to work towards closer relations and develop the bilateral aviation agreement necessary to make the flow of passengers and cargo by air more streamlined. A group known as the Canada-Russia Arctic and North Working Group was reconstituted in December 2004 as directed by the Prime Minister of Canada and the President of the Russian Federation. The Arctic and North Working Group is an advisory body to the Intergovernmental Economic Commission for facilitating bilateral discussions on policy issues of common concern related to the Arctic and the North
Copyright © 2017
 Millennium Airship Inc/SkyFreighter Canada Ltd
Canada and Russia Arctic and Northern Working Group
  There is an increasing realization that as North America’s production of conventional oil and gas enters a more mature stage of their production life cycle; they must look to emerging producing regions to make up the shortfalls cause by the production declines. Oil demand in China is projected to be 6.5 MMBbl/day by 2010, second only to the US Forecast of 25.2 MMBbl/day. This demand may be underestimated because China’s booming economy is growing at a rate of 30% per year. Reserves in 2004 are depleting three times as fast as new reserves are being discovered.
  It is estimated that Russian production could be increased by 15% using technologies imported from the more mature producing countries such as Canada. Consequentially, there will be a high demand for transporting oilfield equipment to these new producing areas in Russia. While much of this equipment could be sent via marine transport because it is destined for the Sakhalin Islands, which can be reached by ships, amphibious hybrid air vehicle might have a role to play in the transport of high value equipment that could be damaged or stolen in transit. The potential impacts and opportunities have been explored in detail in a report prepared by LPS Aviation.
  As well, industry groups are starting to work towards closer relations and develop the bilateral aviation agreement necessary to make the flow of passengers and cargo by air more streamlined. A group known as the Canada-Russia Arctic and North Working Group was reconstituted in December 2004 as directed by the Prime Minister of Canada and the President of the Russian Federation. The Arctic and North Working Group is an advisory body to the Intergovernmental Economic Commission for facilitating bilateral discussions on policy issues of common concern related to the Arctic and the North
Copyright © 2017
 Millennium Airship Inc/SkyFreighter Canada Ltd